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Kayhan: IAEA empty-handed

Monday, 21 May 2012

In an editorial entitled “Empty handed from Vienna to Baghdad,” the chief editor of Kayhan, Hossein Shariatmadari commented on the unexpected visit of IAEA chief Yukiya Amano to Iran just before an new round of talks between the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Iran begin in Baghdad, and disputed his definition of the visit as, “designed to increase the coefficient of understanding.” On Monday and Tuesday of last week, Iranian officials and representatives of IAEA met on the issue of Iran’s nuclear activities. At this meeting, representatives of IAEA again raised non-technical and non-legal questions regarding the possibility of military nuclear activities in Iran, and sought to visit Iranian military bases, particularly Parchin, as well as requested information about scientists and other people involved in nuclear work in Iran. Shariatmadari wrote that, to date, IAEA has not demonstrated a great sensitivity to keeping our military secrets and other sensitive information, and even worked to publish it widely. He then analyzes the “real reasons” for Amano’s visit to Iran:

a) At the meeting in Vienna, the parties postponed the meeting to Monday, May 21, and agreed that at this meeting IAEA would give Iran the documents that it claims include evidence of nuclear activity that is not intended for peaceful purposes within military installation, and they would receive Iran’s answers at the meeting in Bagdad on May 23. Negotiations about the possibility of a visit to Iranian military installations would then be held on the basis of these results. In an illegal step, which violates the IAEA’s own regulations, the representative of the IAEA announced that not all of the relevant documents would be handed over to Iran. Some would be presented, but Iran would not be given copies! Be that as it may, the first meeting in Vienna ended with the aforementioned conclusions. Meanwhile the Iranian delegation, based on that agreement, intended to travel to Vienna for more negotiations on May 21, but Mr. Amano unilaterally canceled the meeting and announced that on that same day he would arrive in Iran! Why was the meeting in Vienna canceled and why is Amano on his way to Tehran?! Despite the declaration made by the IAEA spokesperson that the visit was intended to increase the possibility of agreement, there is other evidence indicating that cancellation of the meeting in Vienna and the trip by IAEA chief to Tehran were intended to create a lack of understanding confusion regarding the nuclear activities of Iran, and make excuses for the hands empty of documents and others for the meeting in Baghdad.

b) Kayhan claims that in fact neither the 5+1 nor the international agency managed by the United States (otherwise known as IAEA) have a reasonable document that testify to Iranian nuclear activity that is not intended for peaceful purposes. Therefore, if the second meeting in Vienna were conducted as originally planned, the 5+1 would have had no choice but to participate in the Baghdad meeting “empty-handed” and would not be able to proffer any excuses. Cancellation of the meeting in Vienna was intended to prevent exposure of IAEA’s empty hands and conceal their imaginary document testifying to the supposed nuclear activity at Iranian military facilities such as Parchin. If this is indeed the scheme, which is quite plausible, we must warn Mr. Amano that he should stop playing on the field of the Zionist lobby AIPAC, and not play into the hands of the Zionists by forcing the Baghdad talks to fail, to the detriment of the citizens of the US and Europe.

 

 

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  • Published: 532 days ago on Monday, 21 May 2012
  • By: Iran Daily Brief
  • Last Modified: May 21, 2012 @ 2:40 pm
  • Filed Under: Military
  • Tagged with: ,
  • Source(s):
    • http://www.kayhannews.ir/910301/2.htm#other200

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